Tibetan buddhist Temple
baronet 4 tibet
Tibetan Buddhist Art furniture & Antiques from the monasteries of the Ser Shong (Golden Valley)
comodo security
Antique Tibetan handpainted Torma Trunk C100-A5

Antique Tibetan hand-painted trunk with Buddhist symbols circa 1870
Antique Tibetan painted trunk left side view with transparent treasure vase and buddhist symbols
front
left side
Antique Tibetan furniture hand p;ainted trunk top view with dharma wheel in mirror circa 1870
Tibetan antique hand-painted Buddhist trunk certified authentic
top
right side

To view larger images, scroll over the above pictures & click. A new browser window will open. Some images can be further magnified in the new window by clicking again on the image.

The holy trinity of Tibetan Buddhist flowers are on this beautiful hand painted Troma trunk, the Lotus, the Ashoka and the Champaka bloosoms are all present. The border of flowers around the front Infinite Knot is blue and red Chrysanthemums. There is great symbolisms on this trunk, with the presentation of the Infinite Knot sitting upon an Ashoka Throne that I have only seen one time before and that was on a smaller torma trunk circa 1700. Please take time to read the iconography to get an understanding of the richness of karmic thought that comes with this trunk. The handles on the sides and the lid's closure is brass. The copper cladding on the corners is a late 20th century addition. This trunk comes with a brush-sign Certificate of Authenticity signed by one of the monks at the Sange Monastery. There is also a map of the area, along with historical notes and pictures of the village and monasteries with explanations and other documentation.


Material: JUNIPER
Dimensions: W=19.75" H=15.75" D=10"
Age: circa 1870

If you have questions contact David email david@baronet4tibet.com

To Purchase this item securely online click here

Torma Trunk C100-A5 Price $429~ SHIPPING & handling= WEST COAST $58 ~ MTN & MIDWEST = $62 ~ EAST COAST= $69. Contact David for a quote to other destinations.

Iconography

The front is bordered with red and blue Chrysanthemums on a gold background. The chrysanthemum symbolizes autumn & the gathering of the harvest. In this case, it is a metaphor for achieving the goal of enlightenment & its accompanying peace. The blue represents compassion. Red is the transmutation of passion into compassion. The gold background denotes the purity of thoughts and actions achieved through this transmutation.

The center of the front has a an Infinite Knot sitting upon an Ashoka Throne, mare's tail cumulus clouds in the sky, stacks of Cintamani at the bottom and suggestions of the Infinite or Endless Knot at the corners and finally there are sets of green rock cliffs pointing to the Infinite Knot. The Eternal, Endless or Infinite, Knot (Sanskrit, "Srivastsa"), is the classic icon for the concept of reality. The interwoven lines are graphic representations of the concept that everything in the world is interconnected, and therefore, dependent origination is the underlying reality of existence.  The knot also reflects the endless cycle of death and rebirth, mirroring infinity and the wisdom of the Buddha. It also symbolizes the Buddha's endless wisdom and compassion. The sanskrit term means 'beloved of the goddess Shri.' Shri refers to Lakshmi, the consort of Vishnu, wherein the shrivatsa term in particular is the curl of hair in a 8 looped knot on the breast of Vishnu (just to further complicate the origins).

The Ashoka, the second of the  trinity of holy flowers which the Infinite Knot is sitting upon, sprouts from the holy water-font of the Amitayus, one of the forms in which the Buddha Amitabha appeared (symbolizing the transformation from greed to discriminating wisdom).  The sprout materialized from a tear that Buddha Amitabha shed when hearing of the deeds of the great warrior Ashoka that overcame all of his enemies to win freedom for his oppressed people. True spiritual freedom comes from overcoming the sins and lusts that enslave the soul. Ashoka ruled a vast empire 2200 years ago and put his peoples welfare and interests above his own, he supported Buddhism, however he was insistent upon religious tolerance and open dialog. Mare's tail cumulus clouds are quite common in Tibet, one metaphorical significance of these fast moving clouds and the pure clarity of the sky; it is an illustration of the Buddha Mind. Clouds may come and go across the heavens, like the transitory thoughts or delusions which appear to obscure the mind's true nature, yet the nature of the sky remains unchanged. this is like the mirror, which is always unaffected by the appearances which arise in it, the sky is clear, transparent, infinite and immaculate. Cintamani are wish-granting jewels and additionally represent wisdom.  When depicted in sets of 3, they represent the body, speech and mind of Buddha such as the practitioner may possess.  Cintamani are also referred to as the “Thinking Jewel” and symbolize the importance of teaching and as well as the enlightened mind. The flames around the border of the Cintamani are symbolic of the burning away of false desires and ignorance, giving way to enlightenment.

The sides have a grand Lotus blossom with lots of buds getting ready to pop out.  The lotus flower  is a natural symbol and represents earth.  Tibetan Buddhist mystics imagined the earth floating like a lotus flower on the oceans of the universe. The heart of the flower is the cosmic mountain, the axis of the universe. The generally acknowledged meaning of the lotus flower is purity of mind or divine creation. From the muck of a pond, where the roots of the lotus reside, an immaculate white flower emerges to rest on the surface of the water as a metaphor for the harmonious unfolding of spirituality. The 3 stages of the lotus, bud, utpala (mid-blossom) and the full blossoming flower represent the past, present and future respectively.

The top has a wonderful mirror with a Dharma Wheel in the center and in that center is the yin-yang symbol. To the right of the mirror is the Champaka Blossom and to the left is a set of 4 Bael fruit. Flanking the mirror's base are Cintamani, the Queen's precious earrings and elephant tusks representing the entire elephant. The mirror is an ancient Buddhist symbol for clarity, completeness of perception, and purity of consciousness. A mirror reflects a thing objectively, but what we see in the mirror is not the thing itself.  Because the object is not seen directly, it may be seen more accurately ~ more clearly, without judgment and with greater perspective.  This can lessen the tendency to see a thing as fixed or solid and encourage better understanding.  The mirror, or perception, more effectively propels the mind toward insight and compassion than mere argument or lecture. The  Dharma Wheel, Sanskrit chakra, Tibetan `khor lo. is in three parts, the wheel exists as a hub, the center of the world.  The 8 spokes denote the 8 paths to enlightenment. These 8 steps work together, not separately.  1. right understanding . 2. right attitude  3. right speech  4. right action  5. right work    6. right effort  7. right mindfulness  8. right meditation  The rim represents the attribute of limitation.  All are contained within a circle, which is perceived to be perfect and complete, like the teachings of the Buddha. The Queens's earrings and elephant tusks are part of the seven Precious Possessions of Chakravartin. Chakravartin, or Wheel Turner in Hinduism refers to an ideal ruler, but in Buddhism, Chakravartin has come to mean a Buddha whose all-encompassing teachings are universally true.  Chakravartin has an army of 4 divisions, infantry, cavalry, elephants, and chariots. Chakravartin is the lineage of 25 Kulika kings or enlightened monarchs, the 25th of which will finally defeat the "non-believers." The Precious Elephant is a symbol of the strength of the mind in Buddhism. Exhibiting noble gentleness, the precious elephant serves as a symbol of the calm majesty possessed by one who is on the path. Specifically, it embodies the boundless powers of the Buddha, which are miraculous aspiration, effort, intention, and analysis.  When elephant tusks are depicted, they naturally are symbolic of the whole elephant. The Precious Queen's heavy earrings are taken as a symbol of comprehension of the Buddha’s teachings.  The weight of the earrings would have caused the wearers earlobes to elongate.  The long earlobes of the Buddha are a symbol of his detachment from all things earthly. The Queen speaks the truth, using no frivolous words and holding no false vices. 

About Us | Site Search | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | ©2003~2012 Baronet 4 Tibet