Tibetan buddhist Temple
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Tibetan Buddhist Art furniture & Antiques from the monasteries of the Ser Shong (Golden Valley)
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Antique Tibetan handpainted Torma Trunk C100-A8
antique Tibetan chest with Buddhist symbols painted, winter dragon with cintamani jewels and flames in joints
antique Tibetan furniture, buddhist torma trunk with Ashoka blossom and Mahamudra Mists and other Buddhist symbols paint on side
front
left side
antique Tibetan Buddhist chest top view with flaming jewels called Cintamani with other Buddhst symbols
Antique Tibetan furniture, torma chest with Buddhist symbol of Ashoka holy flower painted on side view
top
right side

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The top and front of this antique Tibetan Buddhist torma trunk are striking, with an excellently depicted stack of flaming Cintamani on the top set in the Pure Lands and a very happy and well detailed brown winter dragon clutching magical jewels in each of his claws ready to help the practitioner. The border of flowers around the front brown winter dragon is comprised of blue and red Chrysanthemums. There is great symbolisms on this trunk, with the presentation of an Ashoka blossom on each side that is coming out of a font set in rock cliffs. Please take time to read the iconography to get an understanding of the richness of karmic thought that comes with this trunk. The handles on the sides and the lid's closure is brass. The copper cladding on the corners is a late 20th century addition. The back has brass hinges that should be replaced if this is something that you intend to use frequently for storage. This trunk comes with a brush-sign Certificate of Authenticity signed by one of the monks at the Sange Monastery. There is also a map of the area, along with historical notes and pictures of the village and monasteries with explanations and other documentation. The trunk has been cleaned as it had a layer of soot and wax on it which obscured the painting detail, after cleaning the painted parts were coated with a clear acrylic enamel to protect the painted surfaces.


Material: JUNIPER
Dimensions: W=19.75" H=15.5" D=10"
Age: late 1800s

If you have questions contact David email david@baronet4tibet.com

SOLD SHIPPED TO PATTERSON, NY

Torma Trunk C100-A8 Price $529~ Plus shipping & handling= WEST COAST $58 ~ MTN & MIDWEST = $62 ~ EAST COAST= $69. Contact David for a quote to other destinations.

Iconography

The front is bordered with red and blue Chrysanthemums on an orange background. The chrysanthemum symbolizes autumn & the gathering of the harvest. In this case, it is a metaphor for achieving the goal of enlightenment & its accompanying peace. The blue represents compassion. Red is the transmutation of passion into compassion.

The center of the front has a smiling winter dragon clutching pearls or Cintamani. Unlike its demonic European counterpart, the Tibetan dragon is a creature of great creative power; a positive icon, representing the strong male yang principle of heaven, change, energy, wealth and creativity. Dragons are shape shifters, able to transform at will, from as small as the silkworm to a giant that fills the entire sky. Dragons are depicted in one of two colors, green or brown.  The green, or azure dragon of Buddhism ascends into the sky at the spring equinox; it represents the light's increasing power in springtime and the easterly direction of the sunrise. The brown dragon is the autumn equinox, when it descends into a deep pool, encasing itself in mud until the next spring, but its spirit is still with the practitioner bringing wealth and health. The pearls, or jewels clutched in the claws of the dragon represent wisdom and health. The dragon can control the weather by squeezing the jewels to produce dew, rain or even downpours when clutched tightly. The dragon is the vehicle of Vairochana, the white Buddha of the center or the east.

Both sides feature an Ashoka, the second of the  trinity of holy flowers, sprouting from the holy water-font of the Amitayus, one of the forms in which the Buddha Amitabha appeared (symbolizing the transformation from greed to discriminating wisdom).  The sprout materialized from a tear that Buddha Amitabha shed when hearing of the deeds of the great warrior Ashoka that overcame all of his enemies to win freedom for his oppressed people. True spiritual freedom comes from overcoming the sins and lusts that enslave the soul. Ashoka ruled a vast empire 2200 years ago and put his peoples welfare and interests above his own, he supported Buddhism, however he was insistent upon religious tolerance and open dialog. The font is sitting at the top of rock cliffs which represent the syllable "E" which appears in the opening stanza of early Buddhist scriptures, ("'thus,' I have heard"). The blue and green cliffs represent the unmoving nature of the mind when enlightenment has been attained.

The top has a wonderful grouping of Cintamani encased in flames set in the Pure Lands. Cintamani are wish-granting jewels and additionally represent wisdom.  When depicted in sets of 3, they represent the body, speech and mind of Buddha such as the practitioner may possess.  Cintamani are also referred to as the “Thinking Jewel” and symbolize the importance of teaching and as well as the enlightened mind. Pictured here are 6 flaming jewels.  The flames around the border of the Cintamani are symbolic of the burning away of false desires and ignorance, giving way to enlightenment. Adorning the hills are multiple Bilva fruit, also known as the Bengal quince.  Medicinally, Bilva is a potent astringent and highly regarded for its purifying qualities in traditional Indian folk medicine.  The unripe interior of the fruit, especially when made into a jam, was the best known cure for diarrhea and dysentery.  It is regarded as one of the most sacred fruits and serves as one of the main offering fruits.  In this offering of Bilva fruit, representing the sense-offering of taste, the Buddha Amoghasiddhi is manifested as motivation or will.

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